If you know your history and general knowledge like I do, you’d know that Mulan is a character in a Disney story. It is based on the myth of Mulan, a Far Eastern woman warrior, who took her father’s place in battle. May-Lingh Naidoo named her father’s Evo 9 “Mulan”, and one cannot deny that it makes perfect sense.

Her ballie, Kirschlee, is no stranger to these pages, having first appeared way back in Issue18 with his legendary M3, 247BAD. More recently, you might remember Pocahontas, his luminous green in-your-face Evo 8. If that still doesn’t jog your memory, you might have seen his name all over social media, as the call out king. Social media has many pro’s, and as many cons, but one thing is undeniable, it is entertaining, and if you’re a car guy in South Africa, Kirschlee makes it so much more entertaining (almost as much as me). So if you’re calling out the whole world and more, surely you must be able to back it up? Surely you must have a worthy warrior that will not embarrass you while the world watches on? Let’s take a close look at the bite behind his bark…

The Mitsubishi Evo is a monster even in stock form straight off the factory floor. It has a legendary heritage, born in Japan and bred on the rally circuits of the world. The Evo 9 is regarded by many as the best Evo of the lot, but Mulan has seen a few changes. Okay, a lot of changes. It is fully built and a far cry from what came out of Okazaki.

The hearts of warrior princesses are what set them aside from normal foot soldiers, so let us start there. The 4G63 motor is my favourite motor out of the land of the Rising sun, but is very underrated in South Africa, probably because our local market never got the best Mitsubishi had to offer. As Kirschlee often says “This is the replacement for your displacement”. The bottom end received custom Autoboost Manley-spec pistons, which are fitted onto forged Manley rods. ACL race bearings runs on the stroker crank which effectively increases the capacity to a smidgen over 2100cc’s. Of course there are ARP studs and bolts throughout, and lubrication is taken care of by an upgraded oil pump and Moroso baffled sump. The cylinder head has seen an Autoboost-spec port and flow, and the 1mm oversized valves along with titanium retainers and springs are operated by a set of GSC S3 camshafts. Boost is allowed into the combustion chambers via an AMS intake with a Skunk2 Billet throttle body, coming in at a relatively small 68mm diameter but as Kirschlee regularly points out, bigger isn’t always better. A Sheepey Built front facing stainless manifold houses the Autoboost Forced Performance Super 99 turbo. The name is a mouthful, but so is the boost it provides. Visually, the highlight for me is the exhaust and screamer pipes which exit the bonnet. The 2200cc Injector Dynamics fuel squirters are controlled by a performance Mitsubishi favourite, the Link G4+ engine management system.

While the heart of the warrior princess is impressive, her thunder thighs, or drivetrain, attests to her robust abilities. A PPG fully built dog box, something which Kirsch is very proud of, transfers the power via a triple pack Competition Clutch clutch. Once again, Autoboost had a hand in the custom built transfer case and a RS rear differential. This, along with the 18” Hoosiers on lightweight Forged wheels, aid in Mulan’s very distinctive launches. Also aiding traction are the STM D2 drag coilovers, which take care of the thigh gap as well. I’ve seen this car in the flesh many times, and I can safely say without any exaggeration that it is the most impressive car I’ve seen out of the blocks. The only way to describe it is “Sore wa ofu ni fakku!” (Pardon my Japanese but that means it literally fucks off!)

Kirsch is one of those guys that leaves no stone unturned, and nothing untouched. While Mulan was essentially built for go, she is as at home at car shows as she is on the strip. APR carbon fibre bits are adorned everywhere and compliments the custom Burnt Orange paint beautifully. The bodywork and paint is of a show car finish, and as good as our photographers are, images won’t ever do it justice. Evo’s already have a wicked demeanour, but the APR carbon fibre bonnet and front spoiler, with the exhaust and screamer pipes protruding menacingly, really gives one the impression that this is a Samurai warrior, kitted with traditional armoury. I doubt anyone has ever called brakes sexy, but even the Aerospace Components drag spec lightweight billet calipers and lightweight discs captivate you, causing you to drool as you stare.

So there you have it, if you want to be a Call Out King, this is what you’ll need, and you’ll pretty much have a warrior princess to back up your keyboard ninja shenanigans. But wait, there’s more….
What does all of this mean in real terms? Well, Mulan’s power figures are in the region of around 750kw on all four wheels, and she ran a best time of 9.9 seconds at 229.8kmh, on low boost, first time out, while tapping off at around 350 metres because of a red light. If that doesn’t make your jaw drop, then you probably should not be reading this magazine. Considering the amount of fabrication, modification and abuse she takes on each run, the most impressive aspect is Mulan’s reliability.

Then again, if you’re always calling people out, you always need a running car, so she was done right from the outset. Kirschlee, a family man, gives special mention to his kids who are the inspiration for all he does, and to TMT’s #1 dyno strapper, Steven Naidoo.